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The New Garden

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Two weeks ago Roy, Isla and I made a plan for our garden expansion. Last month we had it ploughed and now that it is August the most important month in our garden each year it was time to sow some seeds. Here in South East Queensland the Ekka marks a date in our calendars as to sow seeds of melons and pumpkins. The reason being is that you hope to get some watermelons, rockmelons and pumpkins ready by Christmas time. Everyone loves a slice of watermelon at Christmas.

In the top half on the new garden we decided on making rows for potatoes. The far end would be another row which would be for the rosellas and the luffa plants. The rosellas would also help create wind break for the other vegetables in the garden. The bottom section of the ploughed area is to be all the melons and pumpkins. Sprinkled through this area is also corn.

We bought 15kg of seed potato which my sister Amy helped to cut up and get in the ground, 8 packets of mixed melons and pumpkins and 500g of corn. Sounds crazy but I hope that now it is raining again all those seeds will germinate and by the end of this month I will see all our hard work paying off with new growth. Once all the plants in the bottom section are up I will then mulch around them lightly. Until then I will have to wait and see what comes up.

Last week it rained for a couple of days and we go close to 80mm and now there is drizzle again for a few days. Perfect conditions for plants and hopefully my new veggie patch. With the help of a few friends we managed to knock out all this work while Roy was home last swing and we also mulched the old garden. We had a load of five bales of sugarcane mulch delivered, it works out it takes three bales to do the whole garden.

Shout out to Amy, Julian and Tabitha for all your help to get our veggie patch planted out. We owe you a couple of watermelons.

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That’s me burning stuff. I love it. It has been said in our family the best place to plant pumpkins is in a pile of ash. So when we cleared the  top part of the garden we threw all the dried weeds into a long pile and set it ablaze. We also added a few bits of lantana and gum to the mix. Fingers crossed the pumpkins will love it.

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Nice work, looks pretty good. Four hilled up rows and bean trellis in. Not bad for an afternoons work.

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Above: the Spuds in the ground. Below: Me covering them over with soil.

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Now to  see what it will look like in the coming weeks.

 

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  • Kathy August 22, 2014, 12:32 pm

    Looks like a big effort and it’s great to have friends who are willing helpers as well. Had a look through your Instagram pics and I still enjoy the afternoon walks in the wheelbarrow and the one of the chook sitting on it. Have a good week. Regards Kathy A, Brisbane

  • Helen | Grab Your Fork August 25, 2014, 2:56 am

    Wow look at you all go! And Isla is growing so big so fast!

  • Krista August 25, 2014, 6:51 am

    You live in such a gorgeous area. :-) I love the look of your soil! I’d not heard about pumpkins loving ash. I will have to set up a burn soon. :-)

  • John@Kitchen Riffs August 28, 2014, 1:24 am

    Love your new garden! Great pictures — thanks so much.

  • Caro August 28, 2014, 2:11 am

    Amazing what can be achieved when a group of people come to help out; having friends around and cheerful banter while working really helps the day go with a swing. You have to tell me now: what are luffas and rosellas? We don’t have those names over here in the UK and I’m curious to know what you’re growing!

    • Lizzie Moult August 28, 2014, 7:14 am

      A rosella is a type of hibiscus that produces fruit that we turn into jam. Luffas are a melon like thing that sprawl over the ground. Once the fruit has set and dried the contents is the luffa which you can then use for scrubbing.

  • Daphne August 28, 2014, 9:56 pm

    I’ve never heard of planting pumpkins in ash. I found the brassicas liked it well enough. I wonder what other plants like that kind of treatment.