Military History Museum & Pho 24, Ha Noi, Vietnam

Good morning Ha Noi. Our favourite way to discover a city is getting lost, and trying to navigate with a map that does not help. In Ha Noi, many of the street names were not visible, just go with the gut and direct your way around. The first outing was to explore, eat and visit the Military History Museum.

The streets packed with bikes/scooters, people walking, dangling wires, and tuk tuks beeping to get your attention. It was a new world compared to sleepy Luang Prabang in Laos. Embracing the don’t look policy from China, it was entertaining for us both to cross roads, and hold our heads high and just walk to get from one side to the other. I know yes silly tourists, but we are both alive and did not get hit by any moving vehicles.

Roy being a man. Me a girl, it was not my idea to come to the museum first. We looked at tanks, planes, guns, uniforms and climbed the tower. (photo above – next Roys head).

The coolest part of the museum was the sculpture made of planes. I got up close to investigate different components of the machinery involved and came across what looked like fish. If you use your imagination, the photo below does look life fish, even though it was apart of the huge sculpture of plane parts.

The tower climb was fun, getting to the top which had a small ledge you can hang on to, to take photos. This one is towards the city. The plane art below. The photo of the staircase winding narrowly, enough for one person only –  going up or down.

LUNCH TIME, after walking around the city for hours, and visiting the museum, Roy had read about a pho place which was recommended. Being the master of all things pho, this was our first bowl in Vietnam.

Once it came our to the table, the smell was right, the look was right and even the herbs that came out with it were what we were use to here in Australia. Maybe we are spoilt with quality here. The taste of the stock itself was very subtle, I have to stress the word – very, it could have been washing up water dunked with beef. I usually leave my soup plain, not adding any condiments like hoi sin, soy or fish sauce. As I watched Roy fix his up, I waited to taste to see if that made any difference.

This is a safe place for westerners to try a bowl of pho which is not scary, English menus on the tables, real chairs, clean tables, staff look clean and it is air-conditioned. But if you do really want the real thing, find it on the street. We will be writing about more pho over the next couple of weeks.

So many scooters. Transport is just not the same here in Australia, with such long distances to travel.

Do you think we should embrace scooters more in our cities?

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6 Comments

  1. If I lived in the city, I’d love to be a scooter riding granny. I’ve always been too short to ride a motorbike. 🙂

    I’ve never been to Vietnam but I think I’m nearly ready to confront it.

  2. I’ve been there! It’s so nice to watch your pictures, it’s like a trip back over there.

  3. It’s such a pity the pho was not awesome. We have a rule whenever we travel – we won’t eat at a place unless it’s absolutely crawling to the brim with locals chowing there. We’ve done that in Japan, Bangkok, much of Europe, and despite the language barriers, it’s never failed us.

    As for scooters, I think Top Gear’s Vietnam scooter challenge has scared me off them. :p

    • It is really funny, it was the first time we ate at somewhere that had 4 walls. Melissa you are right, to find the best place look where the locals eat.
      I have not seen the Top Gear’s Scooter challenge in Vietnam. I will find it and watch it.

  4. penny aka jeroxie

    The museum looks amazing and authentic pho! NICE