Red Cabbage Sauerkraut Recipe

Red Cabbage Sauerkraut RecipeSauerkraut recipeSince moving to our new place I have fallen in love with my new home, my garden and the town I now live in. The change has been great. One of the things on my ‘to change’ list was to eat better again.

I use to do a lot of fermenting and make kefir drinks too. It became harder and harder while Roy was FIFO. With us both under the same room again each day. I am getting back to nurturing friendly bacteria. I hope to start making kombucha next, that should be fun and super delicious.

Our new garden was going full swing when we moved in, plenty of veggies growing and luckily eight red cabbages. Just this last week the white cabbage moth has turned up and started to eat all the leaves. Each day I put an end to it by squashing the bugs and harvesting the cabbages.

I used two small cabbages for this recipe which was a total weight of 1.7kg and used 2 tbsp of salt. I was lucky to find a clay pot which is meant for cooking over coals while unpacking. I was given it years ago in hopes of one day making fish in a clay pot. It worked perfectly for the krout (sauerkraut).

Things to keep in mind when making sauerkraut. Make sure that the cabbage is under the liquid use weight to press it down if need be it is very important. You must check on it and monitor its progress. Mine was ready in seven days and it can take up to ten days. It all depends on your level of crunch and the taste of sourness which you prefer.

Do you love fermented foods? Which ones do you love?

Red Cabbage Sauerkraut Recipe

Sauerkraut recipe
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: preserve
Cuisine: fermented
Serves: 1 litre
Ingredients
  • 2 red cabbages (1.5 - 2kgs)
  • 2 tbsp salt
Instructions
  1. Start off by cleaning your cabbages and giving them a good wash. Then make sure that the surface and the knife you are using have been washed and dried. The pot/jar/container you use should also be well washed and dried before beginning. You are trying to create good bacteria.
  2. Slice the cabbages finely into fine shreds, reserving 3-4 outer leaves whole. Place them in a large mixing bowl and sprinkle over the salt. Using your hands scrunch and mix the cabbage. It will slightly soften as you do this and some of the juices will come out.
  3. Pour the mixture in to your crock (container*) and press down firmly. At this point you may need to add a little water to make sure the cabbage is covered. Place the reserved cabbage leaves over the top of the sliced cabbage and press down. You may need to add a weight to hold them into place. These leaves act like a skin for your sauerkraut. Place the lid on your crock and let it sit overnight
  4. The next morning check on your sauerkraut to make sure that all the shredded cabbage is under water. You may need to add more water to ensure that it is covered.
  5. Continue checking and tasting each day until the right flavour and crunchiness is reached. Around 5 - 10 days .
  6. Keep your Sauerkraut in a cool dark place at all times and if you are storing it you may like to leave it in the fridge once you are happy with the fermentation.
Notes
CONTAINER: If you can not get hold of a crock you can simple use a glass jar and keep the lid ajar so the air can circulate. If you use all the cabbage leaves you can also use a brown paper bag or a chux and fix to the top of the jar to act like a seal to let the air in but the bad stuff out.
WATER: Get yourself some bottled water or tank water if you can which is free from any chemicals. You are creating a live bacteria and they like a natural environment to thrive.


Red Cabbage Sauerkraut Recipe

Red Cabbage Sauerkraut Recipe

lizziemoult.com

15 Comments

  1. I have been promising myself to make sauerkraut again and happened to have a red cabbage in the fridge. I followed your instructions and now have a jar of red cabbage sauerkraut sitting on the kitchen counter. I am using an air lock in the lid to exclude the outside air. I bought it last week from a brewers shop and had the air lock inserted into the middle of the lid of the jar. This is the first time I’ve tried this. Let’s see how it works.

  2. I made sauerkraut for the first time this year. I used to hate it as a kid, but my tastes have changed. Fermented kohlrabi spears were really good too. I had more trouble with pickled cukes, but finally got a batch that worked out. I had to do the fermenting in the basement to get it to work. The heat in the house is just too high for it.

    • I have to battle the heat too were I live and I often do all my ferments in the coldest part of the house in the dark if possible. I find that friendly bacteria lurks in the darkness.

  3. I went to a cooking class a while ago where they made sauerkraut -it was absolutely fascinating!! Thanks for a great recipe! Thanks for linking up with our Fabulous Foodie Fridays party! Have a great weekend xx

  4. You have me intrigued Lizzie. I think our science loving Mr 10 would love to get involved with a little project like this and I think my Dad would be a happy recipient of the outcome.
    Thanks for the recipe.
    Have a great weekend xx

    • Fermenting is a science and taste testing along the way is also fun and at time can be a little scary. Good luck with the project and I want to hear if your MR 10 tastes the final product at the end.

  5. Oh cabbage moths are the worst! Glad you rescued these gorgeous cabbages and made such a great recipe.

  6. Yum! I recently received a crock for making sauerkraut…I guess I’d better get onto it! Thanks for the inspiration.

  7. Oh, once again… you are one of my favourite people! My Grandma recently made some of this and sent it down with my mum for me (she knows I love it and I am 3 and a bit hours away…) and I am JUST about finished it… I was thinking I didn’t know what I’d do (become a little obsessed!)… I know now. THANK YOU! 🙂

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